Books, Society

Propaganda of the Deed

The children of Marinaleda have the pleasure to tell you about the situation in Andalusia and specifically, Marinaleda. A few days ago, our parents, in an open assembly, agreed to go on hunger strike. We are in solidarity with them. We have been on hunger strike for several days.

Why are we on hunger strike? We are on hunger strike because our parents have already spent six months living on the alms of community employment. In our village people earn not even two hundred pesetas a day, because sometimes they only work two days a month. We live in such poverty that some families have to borrow money from their neighbours, because the shops no longer give them credit. Put yourself in our place and think: is it fair that while some children are on holiday with their parents and families, others don’t know if they will eat that night? Is it fair that while some children have private tutors, others can’t even attend state schools? Is it fair that while some waste large amounts of money on toys and luxuries, others have no shoes to wear and must go barefoot?

We don’t think it is, and that is why we are on hunger strike. That is why we have gone several days without food, and we won’t stop until a solution arrives, because this situation is unbearable. It is even more unbearable in a land as rich as Andalusia.

Friend: the problem in our land is serious, and so we are going to continue fighting alongside out parents. W will continue fighting because the problem is also ours; so please consider and answer these questions. What will become of us? What is our future? Your future, we imagine, is already resolve, but what of ours? Who will resolve ours?

This is not a fairy tale, but a real situation which you will never know . . . We ask you with all our hearts to stop and think, and perhaps you’ll feel anger or pity and you or your parents will us some solution.

Sorry if these words are strong, but our hunger is stronger. Greetings from your friends. Marinaleda.

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Society

The American Injustice System: Slave Labour and Prison Profits

As Huey Freeman quipped, “the prison-industrial complex is a system situated at the intersection of government and private interest. It uses prison as a solution to social, political and economic problems. It includes human rights violations, the death penalty, slave labour, policing, the courts, the media, political prisoners and the elimination of dissent.”

I want to explore two major economic elements within the U.S. prison system below. Firstly, slave labour within prisons and the connection to corporations, whose products are used by most Americans. Secondly, the privatization of prisons, detention centers and other services, which used to be managed by more accountable bodies. Both of these elements are closely tied to American treatment of minority groups, especially African Americans, and people in economic poverty. Both of these elements have also seen recent social action, by the government and the prisoners themselves. Continue reading

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Documentaries, Society

The American Injustice System: Manufacturing Criminals

Earlier this year, Netflix released Making a Murderer, a 10-episode series that examines the life of Steven Avery. Avery spent 18 years in prison for a rape he didn’t commit. Avery was exonerated with the aid of the Innocence Project and the actual perpetrator was found. To date, the work of the Innocence Project has led to the freeing of 343 wrongfully convicted people based on DNA, including 20 who spent time on death row and the finding of 147 Making_a_Murderer_titlecardreal perpetrators. The TV series then goes on to follow the prosecution of Avery for a second major crime – murder. I would like to focus on this first arrest and later exoneration.

Making a Murderer follows a long line of documentaries that question the results of the criminal justice system in the United States. From The Thin Blue Line to The Central Park Five, American police and prosecutors have been shown to get things wrong. These are not isolated mistakes but, rather, a trend. A trend of innocent people – mainly young, impoverished, African American males – arrested for crimes they didn’t commit and send to prison for long lengths of time. This trend has a long history. It dates back to the American civil war through the Jim Crow era and into modern day drug policy. The two books The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander and Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson document this history well. The result is staggering: Continue reading

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Self

‘Friends of Medecins Sans Frontieres’ UK National Conference

ayzf0blpvq6crijicbrrLast month, I was lucky to attend the Friends of Medecins Sans Frontieres (FoMSF) UK National Conference at Imperial College, London. You might know MSF by its English translation: Doctors Without Borders.

After a warm welcome from Vickie Hawkins, Executive Director of MSF UK, FoMSF student societies from all around England, Scotland and Northern Ireland presented their successes from the year. Groups held fundraisers, movie nights, guest MSF speakers and even a Map-a-Thon (more on this last one later).

Throughout the day, we attended a number of workshops on recent and future MSF initiatives. Each presentation gave us inside knowledge into how MSF operates and how they improve peoples lives. I will now share three of them. Continue reading

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Uganda

Bringing the Hospital to You: KIHEFO Health Camps in Rural Uganda

KIHEFO (Kigezi Healthcare Foundation) is providing health care to not only the urban residents of Kabale but also to people in the outlying villages. In many of these remote, rural areas someone might go months or more than a year without seeing a healthcare provider, due to the cost of seeing a doctor and the distance of travel.

In Uganda, health care covers a range of services. There are the Village Health Teams at the very bottom of the health pyramid; they do some public health services and coordinate with others if needed. Higher up, there are the Health Center II’s, III’s (might have beds), and IV’s which offer a wider range of services. And at the very top, there are the private and government hospitals, where doctors midwives, and all sorts of services are found.

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